INTAGLIO

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  • J.C. HEYWOOD, ROUGH TOCCATTA

    Purchased with Acquisition Fund Grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1986.

    Rough Tocatta is a 1985 composition which alludes to common cubist motifs such as music and intersecting spatial planes. This print was printed with seven colour combonations: black, blue and white, violet and white, deep yellow, magenta and blue black. This intaglio print passed through the press once. The artist writes that the compositional skeleton was made from a collage of enlarged graphite and gouache drawings on frosted mylar. During its print process, power tools and sand paper were employed to give the image its “scratchy” and energetic feeling. The term “toccata” is a musical term which describes plucking the strings of an instrument or keyboard and generally emphasizes a player’s manual dexterity.
  • ED BARTRAM, PRECAMBRIAN RUNE

    1985
    Etching on paper, 13/30
    Purchased with the Acquisition Fund Grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1985.

  • ED BARTRAM, ISLAND SHORE #1, GEORGIAN BAY

    Ed Bartram Island Shore #1, Georgian Bay
    1985 Etching on paper, #5/35

    Station Gallery purchased this piece with acquisition fund grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture.
  • JAN WINTON, RED SEA

    1983 intaglio on paper, 7/12
    Purchased with Acquisition Fund Grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1986.
  • RON ECCLES, CYNOSURE

    1978 Etching on paper 
    Gift of the artist to The Nicholas Novak Commemorative Print Collection and a framing grant from the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1981.

    Cynosure is an etching of a different dimension. The term is evoked by Bowmanville-based artist Ron Eccles in his 1981 print. Cynosure is a celestial beacon, and is also referred to as Ursa Minor or Polaris the North Star. Polaris is 430 light years away or 4300 trillion kilometers away from earth. The central image shows the complex intersection of radial patterns and wedge-shapes. The cool blues and icy whites mingle with vitality.
  • LORNA LIVEY, COFFEE CORNER

    1979 Etching on paper
    Gift of the artist to The Nicholas Novak Commemorative Print Collection, 1980.

    Lorna Livey donated her print Coffee Corner to Station Gallery. This, along with several other pieces from a variety of artists, were gifted in the memory of Nick Novak. The name of Nick Novak is significant to Station Gallery and is embedded in the history of the Gallery’s permanent collection and it’s newly renovated print studio. An active artist with Whitby Arts Inc. before his unexpected death in 1981, Nick was also a regular face seen at Open Studio in Toronto. Lorna Livey’s interior scene shows a homey lunch/coffee corner at Open Studio when it was located at 520 King Street West. Livey shared many moments of ‘rest and refreshment’ with Nick, and Coffee Corner seems exactly what it is meant to portray: a good memory of times with an old friend.
  • J.C. HEYWOOD, RED NICHE

    1983
    etching on paper, 69/75
    SG 85-85
    Purchased with the Acquisition Fund Grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1985.
  • VINCENT SHERIDAN, STARVATION COVE

    1994
    etching on paper, 7/25 
    SG 1995-186 
    The artist Vincent Sheridan travelled to the High Arctic in the late eighties. He became compelled by the ill-fated Franklin Expedition (1845 – 1859) which claimed the lives of all aboard the H.M.S. Terror. This failed expedition sought to discover the North-West Passage and was possible because advances in food preservation and canning were made in the mid-nineteenth century. Once in the Arctic, the crew was frozen in the icy waters and were plagued by disease, hunger and lead poisoning from their canned tins. The crew split into different teams to find a way out of their predicament but perished. In 1989 the artist visited the burial site where he was inspired to complete a series based on the tragedy. In Starvation Cove the artist depicts the artefacts he witnessed first-hand and a skull symbolizes death. In the artist’s own words: ” I seek to focus on, and wander into, the bodies and minds of the ill-fated explorers, searching for clues to the mystery of human nature, our obsession with answers, and our inevitable mortality.”

Process: What is Intaglio?


Intaglio is a printmaking method which involves the creation of an image by carving below the surface of the matrix. Etching is a specific intaglio method which uses acid as the means of carving the image onto a zinc or copper  plate. First, the printmaker  covers the plate in a waxy, acid-resistant ground. The image is made by drawing into the ground with a sharp tool called a stylus, exposing the bare metal. The prepared plate is then bathed in acid which bites into the metal, creating grooves on the plate. Once the plate is etched, the ground is removed, and the plate is ready for printing. The printmaker wipes the ink into the etched grooves, allowing the printed image to be seen. Damp  paper is laid on the plate and the two are run through a printing press. The pressure of the press pulls the ink up from the grooves and onto the paper, creating the printed image.

Process: What is Aquatint?

An aquatint begins a flat piece of metal, either copper or zinc plate. An artist can sprinkle powdered resin directly to the surface of the plate. The plate is then heated; if the plate i s covered with powder, the resin melts forming a fine and even coat. Now the plate is dipped in acid (a liquid that chemically changes the surface of the plate), producing  an even and fine level of corrosion (the "bite") sufficient to hold ink. At some point the artist will then  etch an outline  of any aspects of the drawing he or she wishes to establish with line; this provides the basis and guide for his later tone work. The artist then begins immersing  the plate in the acid bath, progressively stopping out (protecting from acid) .any areas that have achieved the designed tone. These tones, combined with the limited line elements, give aquatints a distinctive, watery look.