LITHOGRAPHY

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  • ERICA RUTHERFORD, BLUE BIRD

    1986
    lithograph, serigraph on paper, 5/19

    Purchased with Acquisition Fund Grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1986.
  • CARL BEAM - SPIRIT OF THE EAGLE

    1980
    lithograph on paper 
    Purchased with Acquisition Funds Grants from Lofthouse Brass Ltd. and the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation, 1996.
    Spirit of the Eagle combines Native mythology and vision with contemporary themes. In the past, this approach has confused art collectors, who could not separate the Native artist from the contemporary artist. By combining his Native heritage with contemporary culture, Beam is attempting to bring the Native artist into the present and out of the past, to become part of the real world, and not some archeological oddity.
  • JOHN GOULD, DON QUIXOTE WEARING BIRD VISOR

    1979
    lithograph on paper 
    Gift of Betty Waisglass, 2000
    This work went with a limited edition book published by the Roberts Gallery in Toronto called “John Gould: The Drawn Image, selected works 1959-1979”. The drawing shows the portrait of the famous Don Quixote, the main character of Miguel de Cervantes’ The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote De La Mancha, written in 1605. The portrait includes the ingenious bird visor made by the slightly delusional Quixote upon the outset of his adventures. His attire included this visor as well as an old ratty suit of armour, and is completed by an even older horse named Rocinante. With his armour, his horse and his honour, Don Quixote sets out to cover 1000 pages of delusional adventures including defending his name and honour, fighting crime and finding love in a farm girl he has never met. In a sequence of funny tales and misadventures, Quixote is subject to slander and beatings yet never manages to lose belief in himself.
  • FRED HAGAN, WORK IN PROGRESS

    1989
    lithograph on paper 
    A Work in Progress is part of a portfolio of 55 lithograph prints, a series called Exploration, a project inspired by the issuance of a series of stamps from 1986 to 1989 by Canada Post. The series relates to exploration of landscapes as well as of the self, and A Work in Progress is the most important of the bunch, as it is autobiographical in nature. The print shows the artist in the act of pulling a print from a press, relating his experience in the printmaking field with that of the Canadian landscape. The image was printed from a stone which was drawn on by the artist. The lithographic stones were prepared, drawn and pulled by the artist in his Newmarket studio. It is interesting to note that each sheet of paper is handmade in St. Armand, Quebec and range in an array of natural colours. The pamphlet which accompanies the suite states: “It {the St. Armand Paper} was selected because its nature has proven sympathetic to the artist’s temperament, intentions and lithographic abilities.” Fred Hagan died in 2003 at the age of 85.
  • OTIS TAMASAUSKAS, TROUT WITH SPIRALS

    1985
    intaglio, lithograph, tusche, 1/2
    SG 85-90
    Purchased with the Acquisition Fund Grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1985.
  • BARRY SMYLIE, CROWCHILD

    1980
    lithograph on paper 
    SG 1980-30 
    Gift of the artist to The Nicholas Novak Commemorative Print Collection, 1980.

    Toronto-based artist Barry Smylie completed five lithographic prints based on the theme of Heroes. The suite was self printed and published at Toronto’s Open Studio in the early eighties. In Crowchild the artist appropriates the Kentucky Fried Chicken logo and mascot as a background to his lithographic print. A coyote is depicted on the foreground of the chicken bucket label. The KFC bucket came to represent the non-identity of a Canadian culture inundated with American fast-food joints and US culture. Similar references have been made in the Tragically Hip video The Darkest One which is a retrospective musing on Canadian culture in the seventies. Harland David Sanders, better known as the Colonel, was an American entrepreneur who founded the ubiquitous chain of fast food restaurants, now referred to the as KFC. It is also interesting to point out a little-known Canfact: Sanders moved to Mississauga, Ontario to manage his Canadian operations in 1965.
  • RON BOLT, CAPE SABLE MAN

    1979
    lithograph on paper, A.P. 6/15
    Ron Bolt
    Gift of the artist, 1987

  • REINHARD REITZENSTEIN, PHASES OF THE SUN

    1979
    lithograph on paper (4 pieces), 14/14
    SG 80-28Fa
    Gift of the artist to The Nicholas Novak Commemorative Print Collection, 1980.

Process: What is Lithography?

From the Greek lithos meaning stone and graphic meaning drawing, Lithography is just that with a couple of twists along the way. This type of printmaking is planographic, meaning the surface of the matrix, usually an incredibly flat and smooth slab of limestone, is not carved into or cut away. The lithographer draws on the surface of the stone using waxy drawing materials, and then treats the surface with an acidic mixture, "etching” the drawing  into the stones surface. This acidic mixture causes the bare parts of the stone to attract water, while the drawn image of the stone repels water. To print the image, the artist washes the drawing material off of the stone, dampens it, and rolls it up with ink, which sticks to the drawn areas of the stone. Paper is laid over the image, and the two are rolled through a printing press, where pressure transfers the ink onto the paper, creating a print.