SCREEN PRINTING

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  • RITA LETENDRE, ROMIR

    1979
    serigraph on paper, #15/150
    Rita Letendre
    Station Gallery received this work as an anonymous gift.
  • SARAH NIND, WINDS OF FLIGHT

    1984
    serigraph on paper, 8/8
    Purchased with Acquisition Fund Grants from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture, 1986.
  • RUDOLF BIKKERS, PORTFOLIO#1 BLOW FISH

    1978
    serigraph on paper
    Gift of Dr. and Mrs. A. Rudnik, 1982.

    In 1978, master printer Rudolf Bikkers generated a suite depicting five creatures. The images combine the worlds of humor and the grotesque. This is a world inhabited by the frenzied fowl, angry goat, a scare crow, a biting beetle and a blowfish. The artist also created a fact sheet for the series. This one page summary accounts for the number in the edition, the number of artist’s proofs, the colour numbers and the weight of paper printed on. An excerpt from correspondence with the artist indicates that “Portfolio #1 (1978) was created for and with my two, at that time young children. They gathered the quill feathers used for the drawings, helped with the printing, chose the animals as well as the titles. The prints were never exhibited, but with the exception of one portfolio for each child, the entire edition sold out within a couple of years.”
  • RON BOLT, SURFSCAPE WEST

    1979
    serigraph on paper

    Anonymous gift, 1988.
    Ron Bolt was born in Toronto in 1939. His landscapes are a testament to the sublime vastness of the Canadian landscape. Interested in the waterways of coasts and rivers, Bolt believes these most wild facets of our countryside define our cultural heritage. Surfscape West is one such image, bordering on the calmness of the tide settling into the beach and the wild ferocity of water overtaking it. He successfully channels the lack of control so characteristic to coastal beaches into one solitary scene, one that seems not only to move inside the image but move the viewer as well. This image is part of a suite of prints produced for the Royal Ontario Museum. The ROM chop is indicated at the bottom, right corner.
  • ERICA RUTHERFORD, EARNSCLIFFE PEI

    1989
    serigraph on paper

    Station Gallery received this work as a Gift from the Artist.

Process: What is Screen Printing?


The process for screen-printing,  also called serigraphy, is deceptively simple. The process utilizes a screen made of tightly woven fabric stretched over a frame, onto which the printmaker transfers the design by creating a stencil. This stencil can be made in a variety of ways; one can draw and paint directly their screen or use photographic methods. Once the stencil is transferred  onto  the screen, the artist is ready to print. The screen is placed stencil -side down over a support  for the image, usually paper. Ink is placed on top of the screen, and is pulled  across the surface of the screen, pushing through the stencil and transferring the image onto the paper. The artist will often create an image  using  several different  stencils, creating pieces full of depth and vitality.